The Methuselah Project by Rick Barry

Methuselah

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Since I’ve been overbooked, I asked a friend of mine, Joe Fausnight, to read and review this book for me. Here’s his take:

Captain Greene was an American Pilot from Indiana who was flying missions over Germany in 1943 when he was shot down.  As his plane fell he cried out to God.  He landed in a woods between to giant oak trees destroying his plane but leaving him and the cabin of the plane intact.

He was picked up by the Nazis and a civilian car was following the truck he was in.  Taken to a secret underground lab he was number 7 guinea pig for a Nazi science project for long life and quick wound repair.

Rick Barry

Author Rick Barry

After they had gassed and worked on the men the place was bombed by the Allies. The scientist who had come up with the project was killed as well as number 1 through 6 men.  He survived as did the assistant scientist and he was kept in a cage for many years after the war was over as they experimented on him and tried to duplicate his success.  He looked and acted like a 30 year old even as decades passed.  He knew nothing of the outside world except what he was told that the war was still going on decades later.

They gave him lots of books to read to pass his time and after reading many classics he asked for a Bible.  He got a lot of comfort from it over the years.  He exercised daily as well as taking flying trips in his mind including all the safety checks so he didn’t forget how to fly.

Did he ever get free?  Did he ever find anyone who cared about him other than as a lab rat?  Did he ever discover the changes in the world since his capture?  You will find out and enjoy this book when you read it.  A very good read and worth the time to read.

I give this books five stars.

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One of my favorite historical fiction authors, Susan F. Craft, releases new book: Laurel

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I’m so excited about Susan F. Craft’s new book, Laurel. I love Susan’s writing so much I read this compelling story in one sitting! I couldn’t put it down.

The book is about a young couple whose daughter is kidnapped by slave runners in the backwoods of South Carolina. The couple hunts for their daughter in the wilderness and finally track her to the shores of the Atlantic at Charleston. While in Charleston, the mother, Lilyan, is recognized as a former patriot who murdered a British officer  (I won’t say why, you’ll have to read the book to find out.)  She’s thrown into jail and confined with prostitutes, thieves and murderers. Her husband, Nicholas, fights to set her free, and continue the search for their missing daughter.

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Susan’s writing is so good I was never distracted by writing craft while reading her book. (This happens to me sometimes as a writer.)  Instead, I lost myself in the story. It’s easy to do because Susan writes vivid description and deep internal emotion and motivation brilliantly.

Susan’s extensive research and travel to the locations of her novels comes through in her writing. I truly felt I was there with Lilyan and Nicholas searching for their daughter.

On her website, http://www.susanfcraft.com, she has over twenty years of research on a wide range of topics.  She says: “I knew I’d never be able to write enough novels to use all my “historical treasures,” so I decided to share and put them on my website.”

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You can follow Susan here:

www.susanfcraft.com

http://historicalfictionalightintime.blogspot.com

http://colonialquills.blogspot.com

http://stitchesthrutime.blogspot.com

http://www.hhhistory.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/susan.craft.108

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/susanfc/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/susanfcraft @susanfcraft

Be sure to check out Susan’s other book: The Chamomile.

The Chamomile

I bought Susan’s book, Laurel, on my own. This review is my unsolicited opinion. If you want to know what makes for good historical fiction writing, read a Susan F. Craft novel!

I give Laurel five big fat stars!

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Would C. S. Lewis be too distracted to write today?

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C.S. Lewis hard at work

I love reading about the writing habits of great writers. Maybe it’s because I’m looking for that one secret element that made them great.

I guess there is one secret that’s consistent with all of them: they worked hard. So much harder than we do today. I’ll explain in a bit.

But first, let’s look at what C.S. Lewis had to say about an ideal writing day in his book, Surprised by Joy: The Shape of my Early Life.

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“[I] settled into a routine which has ever since served in my mind as an archetype, so that what I still mean when I speak of a “normal” day (and lament that normal days are so rare) is a day of the Bookham pattern. For if I could please myself I would always live as I lived there. I would choose always to breakfast at exactly eight and to be at my desk by nine, there to read or write till one. If a cup of good tea or coffee could be brought me about eleven, so much the better. A step or so out of doors for a pint of beer would not do quite so well; for a man does not want to drink alone and if you meet a friend in the taproom the break is likely to be extended beyond its ten minutes. At one precisely lunch should be on the table…”

This “Bookham pattern” he speaks of developed after his father withdrew him from public school and brought him home to be tutored. It was then that a daily routine he grew to love developed.

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And what writer wouldn’t love to have someone bring them coffee or tea, and have a lunch ready for us at 1:00 PM? It sounds heavenly to me, if not to you.

But I suppose that there are things about my writing life that would appeal to Lewis as well–a microwave or Keurig for making tea for example. We may not have housekeepers but we have gadgets that serve us well. Or we serve them. Either way, I think Lewis would have enjoyed them. (PS I don’t have a Keurig but I’m accepting donations…)

Keurig Special Edition (B60)After his lunch, Lewis enjoyed a walk. This is something that I have yet to work into my day consistently. But I know I do feel better and have much more energy when I  exercise. And scientists claim that it makes us smarter:

“Walking 40 minutes four times a week changed the size and organization of participants’ brains in one year, resulting in the formation of new neurons and larger memory centers, according to a study from the University of Illinois.”  (Source: Want to boost your brain power?)

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People knew that walking was good for them long before studies proved it. C. S. Lewis enjoyed walking every afternoon. And unbeknownst to him, it’s probably what got him through the afternoon blahs some full-time writers experience:

“By two at the latest I would be on the road. Not, except at rare intervals, with a friend. Walking and talking are two very great pleasures, but it is a mistake to combine them. Our own noise blots out the sounds and silences of the outdoor world; and talking leads almost inevitably to smoking, and then farewell to nature as far as one of our senses is concerned. The only friend to walk with is one … who so exactly shares your taste for each mood of the countryside that a glance, a halt, or at most a nudge, is enough to assure us that the pleasure is shared.”

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Oh how I love this quote! I tire too easily at ceaseless chatter. There are times when a soul needs time to contemplate, and writers and artists tend to crave silence more than most. I’ve been accused of being anti-social because of my lack of need to share every one of my thoughts. Perhaps it’s because I write them that I feel no need to express them verbally. But I also find it a wearying task to explain them to others. I simply don’t desire to.

Besides walking alone, Lewis also preferred to take his tea alone soon after his walk:

“The return from the walk, and the arrival of tea, should be exactly coincident, and not later than a quarter past four. Tea should be taken in solitude…”

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The man loved his solitude! Proof positive that there are those of us who simply must have it.

It’s tempting to accuse Lewis of being persnickety, but before we make that mistake, we must remember that he is describing an ideal day. And how often does one have those?

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Like us, Lewis had distractions, one of them being mail. He had a love-hate relationship with mail because he was compelled to answer every letter he received. I can imagine he’d have the same attitude towards email that we do today!

“But when is a man to write his letters? You forget that I am describing the happy life I led with Kirk or the ideal life I would live now if I could. And it is essential of the happy life that a man would have almost no mail and never dread the postman’s knock.”

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Writers today complain about time being eaten up with social networking, but I would guess that Lewis spent just as much time writing letters. He was a prolific letter writer and was extremely generous with advice. Also keep in mind, he wrote his letters and manuscripts by hand. How much easier we have it today than writers did even twenty years ago. I’m old enough to have written many a story on a typewriter with gallons of white-out at my side.

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One of the letters he wrote to a young fan, Joan Lancaster, is good advice for writers still today. Notice how he doesn’t patronize or talk down to her:

“1. Always try to use the language so as to make quite clear what you mean and make sure your sentence couldn’t mean anything else.

 

2. Always prefer the plain direct word to the long, vague one. Don’t implement promises, but keep them.

 

3. Never use abstract nouns when concrete ones will do. If you mean “More people died” don’t say “Mortality rose.”

 

4. In writing. Don’t use adjectives which merely tell us how you want us to feel about the thing you are describing. I mean, instead of telling us a thing was “terrible,” describe it so that we’ll be terrified. Don’t say it was “delightful”; make us say “delightful” when we’ve read the description. You see, all those words (horrifying, wonderful, hideous, exquisite) are only like saying to your readers, “Please will you do my job for me.”

 

5. Don’t use words too big for the subject. Don’t say “infinitely” when you mean “very”; otherwise you’ll have no word left when you want to talk about something really infinite.

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One of C.S. Lewis’s Desks

After his tea on a “normal” day, Lewis went back to work:

“At five a man should be at work again, and at it till seven. Then, at the evening meal and after, comes the time for talk, or, failing that, for lighter reading; and unless you are making a night of it with your cronies (and at Bookham I had none) there is no reason why you should ever be in bed later than eleven.”

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C.S. Lewis hard at work

It sounds like a lovely ideal day. But Lewis didn’t have children to care for, chores to do (I’ve read he was an abysmal housekeeper as was his wife whom he married late in life but she was also ill), and focused mostly on the work at hand. Still, he probably had interruptions as we do.

My ideal day would include hours alone, too. But alas, I work mostly in my home office where my family ignores the “Writer at Work Do Not Disturb” signs. To them it’s not a writer at work, but a Mom at home, ready to answer questions, rescue the cat from the dog, and break up an argument between twins.

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However, I have technology the likes of which Lewis couldn’t have imagined. I have word processors that correct my spelling, and search engines for my research. I have over a thousand books in my ereaders and can type 95 or more WPM. I don’t have to invest in paper to send a letter or even a stamp. Perhaps this makes up for the solitude Lewis had.

Just imagine what things he could have created had he lived in our time. Or would he have been too distracted?

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What do you think? Let me know what your ideal day would look like. I’d love to discuss this with you!

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The Butterfly and the Violin by Kristy Cambron: 4.5/5 stars

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If you enjoy WWII fiction, you’ll want to read Cambron’s book, The Butterfly and the Violin. This love story is about an art gallery owner’s search for a haunting painting found at Auschwitz-Birkenau.

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I normally don’t like to read about the Holocaust because it’s too painful for me. I internalize much of the pain and it takes me days to shake loose from the horrors I read about. But this was about a violinist, and as a violinist myself, I wanted to see what it was about. The beautiful cover of this book, I admit, also influenced me to choose it as a book to review for BookLook.

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The author seamlessly ties the story of the violinist’s experiences of Auschwitz with the modern telling of the art gallery owner, Sera. In each story line there is a compelling romance. Adele and Vladimir are in love in the 1940s and both end up in concentration camps after they’re caught helping a Jewish family escape Austria. In modern times, Sera falls in love with Michael who is searching for the same haunting painting of Adele that she is.

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The intertwining of art and music was what I enjoyed most about this book (besides the romance). I did find a couple of glitches in the story (which is why I gave it a 4.5 instead of a 5). However, they are extremely minor and those who aren’t violinists won’t even know they are there.

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Me and my school violin, age 10 or 11

This book is definitely worth the read and would be a safe first book for someone who doesn’t know much about the holocaust. It’s not terribly graphic yet paints a clear picture of what women in concentration camps suffered. But it’s still a lovely escape into the past and into the world of art and music. I highly recommend this compelling book.

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Strong Girl: Malala Yousafzai

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Imagine riding the bus home from school and being ambushed by the taliban because you blog about girls getting an education.

This is what happened to Malala Yousafzai on a Tuesday, October 9, 2012.

The young militants opened fire on the bus, shot Malala in the head and neck, wounded two others, and left them for dead.

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They thought they’d silenced Malala forever but they were wrong. She survived and has continued to spread her message that a girls’ education benefits everyone. It reduces mortality rates, increases lifetime wage earnings, and strengthens democracy.

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Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. She is the youngest person to have ever been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

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Malala’s father sounds a lot like my dad. My dad never limited me because I was a girl. He always told me I could accomplish whatever I set my mind to. Malala’s dad owned a school and encouraged his daughter to write and go to school even though he lived in a society that prized sons more than daughters.

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In July 2013, on her 16th birthday, Malala addressed the United Nations General Assembly:

“We must not forget that millions of people are suffering from poverty, injustice and ignorance.  We must not forget that millions of children are out of schools.  We must not forget that our sisters and brothers are waiting for a bright peaceful future.  So let us wage a global struggle against illiteracy, poverty and terrorism and let us pick up our books and pens.  They are our most powerful weapons.”

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Malala reminds us that some girls face death for going to school. Terrorist groups in Afghanistan and other oppressed areas of the world continue to threaten and attack female students and teachers. Things were improving in some places but with limited presence of the United States in these oppressed areas, girls lives are in danger if they read books and go to school.

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Clearly, Malala is a strong girl with big dreams. The next time you’re tempted to skip school, think of the price other girls in the world pay for the right to learn. Strong girls are readers. Strong girls are educated. Strong girls, like Malala, have the courage to stand up and not sit down for what is right.

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How much better [is it] to get wisdom than gold! and to get understanding rather to be chosen than silver! Proverbs 16:16

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The Daring Ladies of Lowell by Kate Alcott — 4 out of 5 stars

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I love historical fiction and when it features a strong and feisty heroine who is true to her ideals, I think I like it most. This book fit the bill.

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Alice is a farm girl with a dictatorial father. She chooses to leave the farm after her mother dies to work at the cotton mills in Lowell, Massachusetts. While working there, she takes on the cause of the working conditions of the mill. She also advocates for justice for her friend who is killed by a local minister.

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It’s the treatment of the Methodist movement in this book that causes me to give it a 4 out of 5 star rating. Of course, this is a subjective opinion. I realize this. But it does bother me that Christians are so often demonized in secular historical novels and movies. Through the ages there have been thousands of good, caring ministers. But it seems that the secular fiction world can’t help but exploit and highlight the very few rotten ones. (Disclaimer: I’m married to a minister and am an ordained minister myself.)

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I also take issue with the sarcastic attitude toward the Methodists in the way they worshiped. It’s fascinating, though, that the author described the worshipers as prostrating themselves before the preacher, when in fact, people prostrate themselves in Christian worship toward God Himself, not the preacher. At least that’s always been my experience. But isn’t it interesting that the secular world views it this way?

AwakeningIn all fairness, Alcott is historically accurate even in this attitude. The Methodist movement, and religious camp meetings, were mocked in the newspapers of that time (see political cartoon below). They were labeled fanatics and superstitious fools. Charismatics and Pentecostals continue to be targets of such ridicule. Christians of all stripes are told they are superstitious and stupid for their beliefs. Such labels are as old as Christianity itself.

6a00d834518c7969e200e550a37f338834-640wiCertainly, there were charlatans in those days just as there are today. There were preachers in those days that exploited women for money and sexual favors just as some do now. It’s an unfortunate truth. But this can be said of many occupations, not just ministry. There will always be religious leaders who fall into the temptation of greed and lust. It’s just too easy to exploit people when it comes to religion.

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Still, in this story, why couldn’t the murderer have been a mill foreman instead of a Methodist preacher? I’ll tell you why. The secular world loves reading about Christians who fall. It helps them rationalize their hate for Christians and Christianity. Unfortunately, they rationalize that Christianity is a feeble religion because they base it on fallible Christians instead of Christ Himself.

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The story in this book is compelling and while the romance in the book is predictable and a little on the dull side, it was a nice subplot.

millThe most important part of the story is educating us in the working conditions of the mill, the mistreatment of women and children and how society in those days viewed women. It makes me grateful that I grew up with a father who never let my gender determine my dreams. I don’t ever remember thinking something couldn’t happen for me just because I was a girl.

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One of the bad conditions of the mill that I didn’t know about, was the air. They kept the windows closed so the cotton would remain dry. In doing so, women inhaled cotton lint. Many died from lung disease. The working conditions were poor, the pay was poor, and their treatment was poor. The book’s main character, Alice, advocates for better conditions and pay.

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If you love to learn new things when you read fiction (like I do) and if you love historical fiction as much as I do, you’ll really enjoy this book. It would make a lovely movie or series on PBS. I hope they’ll make one. Well, er, that is, as long as they leave out the parts about Methodism.

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Book Review: Take this Cup by Bodie & Brock Thoene

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I have been reading Bodie Thoene since her release of The Gates of Zion in 1986. She is truly the reason why I fell  deeply in love with Christian Historical fiction.

She didn’t disappoint me in this book, either. Take this Cup is book 2 of the Jerusalem Chronicles Series. I wasn’t sure if I would enjoy it as much as I did. I got excited about many new insights I’d never thought of before regarding the history of the Israelites and the prelude to Jesus Christ as Messiah.

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That Thoene is an artist there’s no doubt. But what makes her books, including this one, so special, are the Spiritual Truths and revelations that knowing details of history bring out in the story. For example, I’d never put together that the people of Nineveh worshiped Dagon, a god that’s half fish and half man, and that God used a large fish to swallow Jonah and spit him out preach to these fish-idol worshipers about the One True God. Pretty cool insight.

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There are many others in the book.

I think this book would be a great read-aloud to middle grades and an excellent book to give to a high school student as a Resurrection Day gift. There are several scenes regarding a white hart that kids and teens will especially enjoy. However, it’s definitely an adult book, too. But I can see a classroom of kids really enjoying reading this book together or listening to their teacher read it aloud.

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From the blogger review website:

Though there have been many stories about the Cup of Christ, the Holy Grail, after the Last Supper, this is the first imaginative account of the Cup’s previous history and significance. Nehemiah, the young son of a Jewish woman, a weaver from Jerusalem, is born and raised among the Jews who didn’t return to Jerusalem from the Exile. Educated by Rabbi Kagba, one of the magi present at Jesus’ birth thirty years earlier, Nehemiah grows up with the expectation of a soon-coming Messiah. Could the Yeshua of Nazareth, who is walking the earth, reportedly doing miracles, be that Messiah?

When young Nehemiah must travel the long caravan road to Jerusalem, he is charged with an unusual mission—to carry a mysterious object back to the holy city of Jerusalem . . . an object whose reappearance heralds the Messiah’s arrival.

Nehemiah arrives in Jerusalem just as the final events of Jesus’ earthly ministry are coming to a climax: the Feast of Dedication, the Triumphal Entry, the last cleansing of the Temple, and culminating at the Last Supper in the Upper Room. Only Nehemiah understands the true sacrifice that is to come as he makes the cup worthy of his Savior.

I give this book 5 stars. It’s a flawless, beautifully written story with a unique point of view. I hope parents will share it with their children and teachers with their students. It’s an excellent book for any home or church library. I highly recommend.

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Erica’s Edition: Vikings!

Today’s blog post is brought to you by my hard-working intern, Erica Graphman! Take it away, Erica!

Erica GraphmanI’ve always been a huge fan of history—I actually considered majoring in it until my dad pointed out that I wouldn’t be able to make a good career out of it unless I became a teacher (not really my cup of tea). I love reading about history and especially love learning about different myths that famous cultures believed in. So, in my excitement for the return of The History Channel’s Vikings, I did a little research on the beliefs of the famous group. (I have a feeling that this season is going to involve a lot of mythology!)

The Norse and other Germanic tribes who followed the same beliefs in multiple gods called their practicing a tradition. They believed Odin, Thor, Freya, and Loki were the high gods, known as Aesir. Odin, Thor, and Frigg each have a day of the week named after them (I learned about this in my Structure of the English Language class) Woden’s day, Thor’s day, and Freya’s day (scholars debate whether Frigg and Freya are the same goddess, most think it’s likely because they share the same characteristics). These names eventually evolved to become Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday.

Odin is the king of Asgard and he sacrificed his eye to gain knowledge. Thor is his son and the god of the sky. He can control wind, lightning, and thunder. As noted before, Frigg is Odin’s wife, and she is the goddess of love and the heavens. Women often prayed to her during childbirth. Another common Norse god is Loki, the god of mischief, who is so handsomely represented by Tom Hiddleston in Marvel’s Thor.

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The Vikings believed in four different realms. The gods dwell in the realm of Asgard while humans remain in Midgard. There are two places Viking warriors can go when they die. If it is a worthy death, aka bravely in battle, they pass on to Valhalla where they feast while waiting for the end of time. If they do not die a heroic death, they must remain in Hel, which the Vikings considered the ninth world. After reading all this crazy information about the Viking gods, I must say, I’m super excited to see this season of Vikings, especially to see which warriors take their places in Valhalla and which fall to Hel. (I’m rooting for strong, female warrior Lagertha to kick butt!)

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Write riveting historical fiction

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Introducing inspirational author, Paula Mowery

Paula Mowery, Author

Paula Mowery, Author

From the time I met Paula online, I’ve felt a kinship with her as a pastor’s wife and homeschool Mama. I’m very pleased to have the opportunity to introduce my readers to her wonderful writing!

Paula is a pastor’s wife and a former homeschool mom to a daughter who just started Liberty University Online. She works part-time as an assistant in a Pre-K and is a published author, speaker, and acquisitions editor for Prism Book Group.

And now for the interview!

And now for the interview!

Paula, I’m so happy to have you here today on my blog. Please tell my readers about your writing space! (I don’t know why I’m intrigued by people’s writing caves but I am!) Where do you write?

My husband calls it my writing hole. I have a wonderful L-shaped desk in a back extra bedroom. It is somewhat like being in a hole since it is at the end of the house away from everyone and most distractions. On one side of the L is my laptop. On the other side is stacked notes and lists of my present projects for writing and editing.

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Sounds fantastic. What is your process? (Spreadsheets, Snowflake, Lists/Outlines, Seat of the pants?)

I’m what you might call a combo writer, meaning that I’m not totally seat of the pants but also not a big outliner. I normally get an idea and scratch it out on a piece of paper, putting it into a file. As I have other ideas for that story, I will add notes to that file. I usually make a short list about what the story is about, who it is about, and where it is headed. When I’m ready to start writing, I skim my lists and notes and then take off. I’m categorized as old-school because I write out my stories first in spiral notebooks. The only things I can compose directly on the computer are articles and blogs. I just can’t write a novel that way.

I love notebooks!

I love notebooks!

I use notebooks, too, but usually when I’m on the run. Tell us about your book, Be The Blessing.

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My novella, Be The Blessing, released on September 13th. The main character in this book is a pastor’s wife named Addy. She wants to follow what God would have her to do but struggles when God asks her to be a blessing to others even when she is suffering through trials of her own.

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Another title, Brave New Century, released November 14th. This is an anthology of four stories set in cities in the 1900’s. My story is called “Forgiven” and is particularly special to me because of a scene that I included that really happened to my paternal grandfather.

Why will readers want to read these?

I would encourage readers to pick up Be The Blessing for encouragement and even challenge for your Christian walk. The novella includes a short Bible study for further personal application.

Readers will enjoy Brave New Century for the sweet romance and historical aspects.

Ah, romance!

Ah, romance!

How did your book come to life?

Be The Blessing is actually the second in Addy’s story. When the first, The Blessing Seer, was completed, my editor asked if there would be a sequel. I hadn’t considered it until she asked. That evening the ideas starting coming, and Addy’s story continued.

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Brave New Century was the brainchild of co-author, Lisa Lickel. She put out a call on a writer email loop for those interested in writing a story set in 1900 in a city with romance. Lisa, Teena Stewart, Kathy Rouser, and I corresponded. The result is the anthology, Brave New Century.

Who is your favorite character in the book and why?

In Be The Blessing I have to say that Conrad is my favorite character. I don’t want to give away anything about him. Let’s just say he is a little different and mysterious.

In my story, “Forgiven,” I really like Henry. Henry Smith was my grandfather. I never had the opportunity to meet him, because he died before I was born. I do have this newspaper article about him which is where the whole story was born.

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How did you name your characters?

For The Blessing Seer and Be The Blessing I used a Christian baby name book. I wanted the names of the characters to have a significance as to their personality or importance in the book.

“Forgiven” utilizes my grandparent’s real names as well as the names of people in the newspaper article.

Why will readers enjoy your book?

As with anything and everything I write, I pray readers will enjoy my books because of the impression that is left on them. I hope and pray that they can be encouraged in their Christian walk or maybe encounter a need for a Savoir for the first time.

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Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book. ~Author Unknown

Is anything in the book based on your own life?

Be The Blessing does include some real occurrences from my experience as a pastor’s wife. Some of the events that Addy must endure and go through with church members has happened in my life.

What is your favorite scene in the book?

My favorite scene in Be The Blessing is the moment that Conrad tells Addy that she looks more like Jesus. I crave that!

Oh to be like Jesus!

Oh, to be like Jesus!

Why Christian fiction?

I only read Christian fiction and some nonfiction. I only write Christian literature. First, I feel God has called me to a writing ministry. Second, I desire to communicate Christ through what I write so that others may encounter Him, too. I want to encourage Christians to fulfill what God has planned for their lives.

Is there anything else you’d like us to know?

All I can add is that God has so blessed me as well as humbled me by allowing me to write for Him. I promised Him long ago that if a book I write only touches one for Christ, that is enough reason to write it.

Find Paula Online:

Blog: www.paulamowery.blogspot.com.

Book reviews and articles: www.christianonlinemagazine.com.

Find her editor bio under “submissions” at www.prismbookgroup.com.

Paula, thanks so much for sharing your books with us today! Have a question for Paula? Please send them to us below!

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