Are you still here?

Congratulations! I think. I mean, if you’re reading this right now, it means you’re still here and the world hasn’t come to an end. Or, if the rapture has occurred, and you’re still here, then it’s not congratulations that’s in order, but some advice on how to make it through tribulation. Today is the first day of autumn. It’s also a day that many have predicted will either usher in disastrous change for the world, the tribulation, or the rapture. Many believe the return of Messiah is imminent, including a prominent Jewish Rabbi who is urging all Jews to come home to Israel. He believes that at the end of the sabbatical year the Messiah will return. The end of that year was September 12, 2015. So far, I haven’t seen Messiah, but expecting Him to come any second is how we’re supposed to live. I have eagerly awaited His return since I was a small child. Sept. 22-23 is Yom Kippur., or Day of Atonement. It is also the beginning of the Year of Jubilees. Some find it ironic that the Pope is coming on the holiest holiday of the Jewish people because they won’t be able to participate in the arrival. They also find it a tad coincidental. Others believe that today marks the beginning of tribulation based upon calculations of Daniel’s 70th week.  Countless books have been written about September 2015.  Even Isaac Newton wrote about Messianic predictions surrounding September 23, 2015. CERN was also supposed to have a major colliding event today, but all references to it have been removed from their website. Now they claim that the machine has been powering up since June 15 and nothing unusual is happening today. They’ve even removed the CERN calendar that used to be available. Coincidence? Is there something to hide? (If you don’t know about CERN, you can learn about it and science’s search for the God Particle here and here.) If you want to get even more freaked out, just type “CERN September 23, 2015” into the google search engine. Go on. I dare you. Just set aside about a year to read it all. Now, if that’s not enough to freak you out, check out the SESAME project. Go ahead. I’ll wait. sesame (n.)early 15c., probably from Middle French sisame and directly from Latin sesamum (nominative sesama), from Greek sesamon (Doric sasamon) “seed or fruit of the sesame plant,” a very early borrowing via Phoenician from Late Babylonian *shawash-shammu (compare Assyrian shamash-shammu “sesame,” literally “oil-seed”). First as a magic password in 1785 translation of Galland’s “Mille et une nuits,” where it opens the door of the thieves’ den in “Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves.” Phraseopen...

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Shana Tova! Happy 5776!

  I wrote about Rosh Hashanah in depth last year, so most of this post is the same. But it’s such a beautiful symbolic  holiday to Christians as well as Jews, and I wanted to share the information again. Especially in light of the Shemitah and the buzz going on about danger coming on Yom Kippur September 23. (I’m not saying I agree with this. But I’m not ignoring it. I’m prayerfully trusting in God! The safest place to be is in the center of His will, so that’s where I’m trying to walk.) Rosh Hashanah 2015 (5776) begins at sunset on Sunday, September 13th and ends on the evening of Tuesday, September 15th. Rosh Hashanah is known to Christians as the Feast of Trumpets. Some Christians believe that Christ will return on Rosh Hashanah. But since no one knows the hour except the Father Himself, we can’t know, either: “But about that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father” Mark 13:32 For the Jewish people, today is a day of dipping apples in honey and contemplating what they’ll do differently in the coming year. The “Feast of Trumpets” is mandated in Leviticus 23:24: “On the first day of the seventh month you are to have a day of sabbath rest, a sacred assembly commemorated with trumpet blasts.” Rosh Hashanah  is the first of ten days of repentance. The shofar, a kosher ram’s horn, is blown to call God’s people together to repent of their sins. During the synagogue service, it sounds 100 notes. It’s a day of remembering God’s judgement as well as a day of celebrating His mercy in the new year. Our church blows the shofar each Sunday at the beginning of the service. Have you ever tried to blow one? It’s not as easy as it looks! It’s taken me a long time to learn to blow it, but this past year I finally learned how! Ours is a smaller sized one from Israel: Here’s a great video about how they’re made:     On Rosh Hashanah it’s customary to greet others by saying: “L’shana Tova – Ketivah vi-chatima Tova.”  “This means, For a good year – You should be written and sealed in the Book of Life.” Jewish tradition teaches that on Rosh Hashanah, God inscribes the fate of every person for the upcoming year in the Book of Life. In this way, it marks the beginning of the Ten Days of Awe, during which Jews reflect upon their actions over the past year and seek forgiveness for their transgressions in hopes of influencing God’s final judgment. But Christians believe that their names are...

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